Canada stunned and worried about Trump trade threats

Published 08-29-2018

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TORONTO (AP) - It started with President Donald Trump's attacks on Canadian dairy farmers. Then Washington slapped tariffs on Canadian steel, citing national security. There was that disastrous G-7 summit in Quebec. Now it's a new North American free trade agreement that excludes America's northern neighbor.

Canadians are stunned by the repeated broadsides from what has long been their closest ally and some have even begun boycotts.

"Everybody is afraid," said Margot Lajeunesse, who helps run a family-owned bistro in Quebec. "We depend a lot on the U.S."

About 75 percent of Canada's exports go to the U.S. so the tariff threat looms large after Trump snubbed Canada and reached a preliminary deal with Mexico.

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FILE - In this June 8, 2018, file photo, President Donald Trump talks with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau during a G-7 Summit welcome ceremony in Charlevoix, Canada. Canadians are stunned by the repeated broadsides from what had long been their closest ally and some have even begun boycotts. It started with Trump's attacks on Canadian dairy farmers, then Washington slapped tariffs on Canadian steel, citing national security. Then it was a disastrous G-7 Summit in Quebec and now it's a new North American free trade agreement without the northern tier of the continent. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File) - The Associated Press


Canada's Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland speaks to the media during a break from trade talks at the Office of the United States Trade Representative, Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin) - The Associated Press


Canada's Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland speaks to the media during a break at the Office of the United States Trade Representative, Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018, during trade talks in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin) - The Associated Press


Canada's Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland speaks to the media as she arrives to the Office of the United States Trade Representative to continue talks on trade, Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin) - The Associated Press


NAFTA eliminated trade barriers between the U.S., Canada and Mexico is considered beneficial to all three, however, a withdrawal from the agreement would impact Canada and Mexico more severely than the U.S. - The Associated Press